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Jonathan Gifford

If you want to win, you need performance thinking

If you want to win, you need performance thinking and The Five Principles of Performance Thinking by Dr Mark Powell and Jonathan Gifford tells you just that. The organizations that are succeeding in the modern world are the ones that are putting on a great performance in the fullest sense of the world – the ones that are delighting their audiences. The Five Principles of Performance Thinking reveals the mindsets and techniques behind every great performance and shows us how to deliver winning performances of our own.

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4 tips on how to practice in business

The performance mindset begins, rather prosaically, with practice. The practice is where creativity begins. Musicians play scales and exercises for hours at a time. Dancers build stamina and core strength in the gym, and then they are their dance partner work on small aspects of their routine – for hours every day, day after day. Actors spend weeks studying scripts and talking to themselves, looking for a way to inhabit their role. All great performing artists practice very hard. Nobody masters their craft without practice. The same tips apply to how to practice in business. We hear from authors of The Five Principles of Performance Thinking by Jonathan Gifford and Mark Powell.

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Why corporations are not social structures

Machiavellian Intelligence, by Dr Mark Powell and Jonathan Gifford, explores a new type of intelligence that might be key in gaining access to the top executive positions in your career.

Here, we look at why they believe corporations are not social structures:

We often talk as if the corporations that so many of us work for are in some way natural or organic; that they are ‘communities of like-minded people’ or ‘associations of individuals’ who have come together to pursue a common purpose.

If this were true, the world would arguably be a better place, but it is not true.

Corporations are not ‘communities’ or ‘associations of individuals’. Corporations are legally – and in every practical and philosophical sense – individuals; entities that have a life of their own. They can endure for centuries, outliving many generations of corporate executives, and they can change and adapt in nature, sometimes radically.

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